A Teaching Story

This is an excerpt from the Muse Storytelling Blog. Please go to musestorytelling.org for more great posts, tips and tools on cinematic storytelling. This article was written by Kathryn Giroux and published on January 29, 2018 at Muse Storytelling. All rights to this post belong to Muse Storytelling.

What is a teaching story?

A Teaching Story is used to share a lesson or educate somebody on the why and how of a new skill. By wrapping information in story, you not only better connect an audience, but you help an audience to absorb that lesson or skill in a lasting way.

A group of neuroscience researchers from Princeton University discovered a phenomenon called neural coupling. When a person hears a well-told story, the physical activity in the listener’s brain mirrors that of the storyteller’s brain. So whether you learn a lesson yourself, or hear someone else’s experience of coming to that conclusion, your brain reacts in the same way.

This is part of why using stories is so incredibly powerful.

Kathryn's First Ever Interview from stillmotion on Vimeo.

An Objections Story

This is an excerpt from the Muse Storytelling Blog. Please go to musestorytelling.org for more great posts, tips and tools on cinematic storytelling. This article was written by Patrick Moreau and published on January 23, 2018 at Muse Storytelling. All rights to this post belong to Muse Storytelling.

What is an Objections Story?

The simplest way to think of an Objection Story is that it starts with the objection and then takes the audience on a journey to a new way of thinking.

There is an age-old proven sales strategy that’s known for being particularly effective at overcoming objections. This technique works so well because it leverages several storytelling principles.

The technique is called Feel, Felt, Found. The premise is to start by restating that you understand how the other person is feeling, then bring in an example of somebody else who has also felt that way, and then end with what you’ve found worked well for them.

For example, if your clients often have an issue with your preference to tell stories over including a ton of facts and figures, the Feel, Felt, Found strategy could sound something like this:

“I understand Mrs Client that you feel that story may not be the best way to approach this project. We did a campaign launch for a large nonprofit that really needed to ensure what we created delivered results, and they too felt that story might not be the right approach with so much riding on the piece. However, what we found was that by intentionally creating a story, we could connect their audience to the cause in a much more emotional way— and they ended up exceeding their 36-mo fundraising goal inside the first year!”

In many ways, the Objections Story works much like Feel, Felt, Found. You want to make sure you’re identifying the objection, and then take them on a journey of somebody overcoming that objection to achieve great results.

Through the story itself, they feel this new way of thinking, and you’ve got a much greater chance that they’ll change their position.

Stupid. Just Stupid. An Objections Story told by Siouxsie Alarcon. from stillmotion on Vimeo.

The Origin Story

This is an excerpt from the Muse Storytelling Blog. Please go to musestorytelling.org for more great posts, tips and tools on cinematic storytelling. This article was written by Patrick Moreau and published on January 17, 2018 at Muse Storytelling. All rights to this post belong to Muse Storytelling.

Everything about Stillmotion Video is fantastic and team has done it again! They are releasing a 7 part blog series on the different types of story. Beginning with The Origin Story. To read all the wonderful details go to: https://musestorytelling.org/blog/how-to-tell-an-origin-story

What is an Origin Story?

The origin story–the story of how a business, idea, product, or service came to be–is one of the most common, and most powerful, types of stories we can tell.

It’s a story that every storyteller should be familiar with because many of your clients can benefit from having a strong origin story created for them. And you need to be able to tell your own origin story to really build trust and create a connection to your own brand.

Why Tell An Origin Story?

Well, a few reasons. First off, there are way too many choices out there. Buying anything from Ketchup to getting your lawn mowed presents you with dozens of different options. Nearly every option will have their own marketing spin and it is hard to know what you can trust.

An Origin Story shares how something came to life, and in doing so, it lets the audience connect with the people behind the something. This type of story builds trust, confidence, and an emotional connection to the brand.

The Origin Story is less about teaching or imparting knowledge, and much more about taking the audience on an inspiring journey that leads the audience to believe in the people.

A powerful facet of the Origin Story is that nobody can take yours.

While we might share a similar vision, other companies can have a similar impact, and we may have the same values–how you brought something to life has much more originality to it. And that originality is a powerful way for the company to stand out and create a unique connection.

The Origin Story of Muse from stillmotion on Vimeo.

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